Thursday, March 21, 2019

The results are in!!

Thank you all for giving your feedback in our first ever Facebook poll! Even I was surprised that there was SO much support for creating a bilingual website - as much as 83% of you said to prefer to read the recipes and stories in both English AND Dutch.

As you can imagine, it will take a little time to rework the whole website - we have almost 300 recipes on The Dutch Table. Any new recipes will be written in both languages and with corresponding measurements, and the older ones will get translated and re-measured as we go.

In the meantime, there are a few things you could do to make sure you stay updated:

 1. Like our Facebook page, if you haven't yet, so you can see what recipes have been updated - I will post updates as we go. And please share the good news!

 2. Subscribe to our YouTube channel. We have short cinema reel news videos about Dutch food and traditions from last century, and the videos have both Dutch and English subtitles - courtesy of yours truly. it's a great way to get some insight into the times from our parents and grandparents.

 3. Join us on Instagram! We're the_dutch_table. We are not entirely sure what we're doing, or if any of you is on Instagram, but nevertheless, come take a peek - maybe you can help us figure this thing out!

Lastly, we've started to add Shopping Suggestions at the bottom of our recipes. If you are an Amazon customer, we would appreciate it if you would consider shopping through our links. We receive a small financial contribution for a portion of your purchases, which will help keep our website up and fund our research into new recipes, history and ingredients.

The website, the videos, the recipes and everything else is our labor of love, because of our passion for Dutch food and traditions - if you enjoy what we do, we'd appreciate your support!

Thank you again,
Nicole 

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Itching to get back in the garden?

Are your fingers itching to get started in your garden? If you're an avid gardener like I am, you are probably already looking through your seed catalogs to see what you will grow next and can't wait to get outside.

Or maybe you've never grown a thing in your life, but are willing to give it a go. Did you know that a lot of the vegetables we use in our Dutch cuisine can be easily grown?

If you do, you are in good company. Besides growing fruits and vegetables on balconies, in back gardens and side yards, the Dutch also have almost a quarter million volkstuinen where they spend much of their time. These "gardens for the people" are usually small plots of land that are leased (often indefinitely) from either the city administration or from gardening associations who own or manage these plots of lands. The land is usually on the outskirts of the city or town. Some plots are small and can be found along railways and roads, others are larger and can even contain small huts or greenhouses. The largest volkstuin complexes even have small petting zoos, nature reserves and during the growing season, even small farmers markets.

Many families spend whole summers on their volkstuin place, if the local agreement allows. It's close to home and gezellig, as a volkstuin always has several plots with other gardeners and their families. People share crops, seeds and chats alongside short fences. I'm sure you can imagine that, if you live "third floor up, in the back" and hardly see the light of day, spending a summer outside, with trees, a splash pool, and your family around you is sheer delight!


Growing foods and flowers also creates an opportunity to make memories. It's fun to share this with kids or grandkids, and gives you an opportunity to share your heritage and family stories. If anything, you'll eat healthier foods that you have grown yourself, or grow those that are hard to come by in the store! And if you don't know how to grow anything, you can always ask your local master gardeners in your local university extension office, or that neighbor with the beautiful flowers and vegetables down the road- as gardeners, we're always happy to share information.

I've added a page, Dutch Gardening, to the website, with a short description of traditional Dutch vegetables, and links to places where you can order seeds. Take a look and see if your favorite vegetable is listed. If not, give us a holler in the comments and we'll add them!

Happy gardening!

Friday, March 1, 2019

What's new?


Hello all!

It's a new year and we're working hard on sharing the love for Dutch food and food traditions: we're updating the site, re-testing old recipes and working on new ones, taking new pictures and reading up on old traditions!

We've also expanded our reach and have started a YouTube channel. I've come across a whole pile of these old cinema reels that show what life in the Netherlands looked like during the last century. Some of you may remember these times, others have only heard about it from their parents or grandparents. I'm trying to focus mostly on food related news flashes, but others are just too interesting or curious to leave behind. Take a look at the Twentse Boerenbruiloft - Farmer's Wedding in Twente, for example, or the short Emigratie naar Canada - Emigration to Canada from 1948.

Please consider subscribing to the YouTube channel so you can see the updates as I post them.
Here is a cute video that will take you to the channel, or click on the link above to see all the videos. The news is from 1948 and, as I said on our Facebook page, sometimes we forget how good we have it.



Lastly, I get a lot of questions on what products I use for recreating the recipes, or what types of pans or tools I use. To help out, as I am reworking the recipes, I am adding a selection of Amazon product links on the bottom of the page. I am handpicking these personally, and for every recipe. As an Amazon Associate, I do get a small amount for every purchase that is made through the link. This is the first advertising I am adding to the page, as I have declined to do so earlier, but I thought it might help. Take a look - both the erwtensoep (split pea soup) and the bitterballen recipes have these links already.

Soon, we'll have some additional news on how we're expanding our reach and share our love for Dutch food and food traditions: we're already on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and Pinterest - can you take a guess?

Thank you for your support of this site and for your appreciation of our cuisine - keep cooking, keep sharing and stay healthy and happy!

Groetjes,
Nicole