Thursday, December 22, 2011

Appelstroop

Appelstroop, or apple syrup, is one of those condiments or ingredients that make Dutch food Dutch. Spreadable like a thick molasses, appelstroop is made from reducing apple juice with other sugars until it thickens into a dark, gooey, thick syrup. A variety of products exist: rinse appelstroop is made from appels and sugarbeets, delivering a sweet and slightly tart (rinse) flavor, a sweeter stroop made with apples and pears (where pears contribute to a higher sugar content) and one that's consumed further down south which is an apple/pear/date stroop. All three delectable for using on toast, pancakes or rabbit or beef stews.  


Appelstroop
3 cups of apple juice or apple cider
1 cup of sugar
2 tablespoons of dark molasses

Stir the sugar into the apple juice and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer for the next twenty minutes. When the liquid has been reduced to about half, start monitoring the temperature with a candy thermometer. As soon as the syrup has reached 235F, take the pan off the stove. Let it cool, stir in the molasses and serve with the pancakes. This appelstroop, when still warm, is not as thick as the commercial product but will thicken when refrigerated. The flavor is very close to the original. Makes one cup.

11 comments:

  1. Wow never thought about making that. I may try that one day.

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  2. Do you know how this could be adapted using frozen apple juice concentrate (thawed)? Of course I could reconstitute it and then follow the recipe exactly, but it seems silly to add the full amount of water only to cook it down again.

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    1. Jen, good question and a very valid one. I have not worked with apple juice concentrate before so am not sure. Besides reducing the water in the original recipe, the prolonged boiling also caramelizes the sugars and creates the dark, concentrated color and flavor. The boiling point increases and sugar becomes syrupy. The more water evaporates, the syrupier (is that a word?) it gets until turning into a hard brick.

      It may work with just adding sugar to the concentrate and bringing it up to a boil, but perhaps there is not enough time to reach the right temperature before it scorches. Just guessing here. Is the concentrate something you purchase commercially or is it homemade? If I can find, I will gladly test it out for you!

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    2. Thank you for taking the time to answer!

      Here in the midwest, frozen apple juice concentrate is available at any grocery store. It comes in a 12 oz. can and is prepared by mixing with 36 oz. of water.

      I didn't think about the caramelization. It makes sense that it would take at least some water added to the concentrate to make it work.

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  3. I have made this appelstroop using clear apple juice (as opposed to old-fashioned apple juice which is cloudy). The appelstroop is really very nice - I am happy to lick the spoons clean.

    Jo

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  4. Can you "Can" this stroop to give to family and friends and to store for yourself of course?? :-) Love the recipes

    Lisa Blok

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  5. Lisa, yes you can :-) but appelstroop's sugar concentration is very high so does initially not need any canning. Just fill the jars and apply the lid when the stroop is still hot. The appelstroop will hold for quite some time, as long as it's kept in a dry, cool place. What a great idea for a holiday gift!

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  6. Eindelijk! Ik ben al jaren op zoek naar een recept voor appelstroop, wat ik nog meer mis dan pure hagelslag of filet americain. Gaan we lekker proberen voor de feestdagen. Dankjewel!

    Arend.

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  7. LOVE LOVE LOVE appelstroop. I'm going to have to make this when I replace my thermometer. :)

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  8. My Dutch husband & family introduced me to this & I LOVE IT! It is very high in iron which is a big plus too. Do you know if the homemade appelstroop has the same vitamin & mineral content as purchased rinse appelstroop? ~Stephanie

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    1. Stephanie, I always thought appelstroop contained a lot of iron too, but it's not entirely true. Commercially processed appelstroop has the addition of concentrated sugar beet juice which accounts for much of the iron content and minerals. The type of iron it contains is not easily absorbed by the body. Apple juice by itself contains some iron, and dark molasses does too. Rinse appelstroop has 8 to 10mg of iron (the daily recommended value) per 100gr, the ingredients for this recipe contain approx. 4mg of iron altogether. The amount of vitamins in both products is negligible. Hope it doesn't stop you from enjoying either stroop, but they may not be the best source for iron!

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